Small Business

15 Quotes from Powerful Women in Tech

Woman in tech quotes

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) roles have remained predominantly male industries. That trend continues despite the heavy emphasis on diversity and gender equality by small and large companies.

According to The National Girls Collaborative Project, fewer than 30 percent of science and engineering roles are filled by women. Roughly 25 percent of computer and mathematical roles are filled by women. Not only are fewer women working in STEM education and careers, but they are also more likely to be overlooked, underpaid, and challenged by male counterparts. 

From the lack of role models in leadership roles to glass ceilings and underrepresentation, women have to struggle to gain equality in the workplace. 

Despite these challenges, women continue to make huge contributions and advancements in their fields and serve as role models for other professionals everywhere. 

In honour of International International Women’s Day on March 8 and Women’s History Month, we’re highlighting powerful woman who serves as an inspiration in the tech industry.

Entrepreneurship

“Entrepreneurs need to start building today. The barrier to entry in tech is low, so start designing, start coding it, launch it, build prototypes, build a working version of it. The Internet has amazing powers of distribution. You can test your ideas. You can see if it works, if it doesn’t work, whether it’s fun, and whether you’re sufficiently motivated. People who go into entrepreneurship to get rich aren’t going to be happy. It’s the building of things that makes you happy. You have to enjoy the process whether you succeed or fail.”

Catrina Fake, Co-founder of Flickr

“I remember having this conversation with myself one day and I just said, you know what? This is not rocket science. You’re gonna figure it out.  I just decided that I was going to have enough confidence in myself to figure out whatever I needed to figure out and then surround myself with as many smart people as possible.”

Leah Solivan, Founder of TaskRabbit

Read the full article here.

Leadership

“One of the most important things for any leader is to never let anyone else define who you are. And you define who you are. I never think of myself as being a woman CEO of this company. I think of myself as a steward of a great institution.”

Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM

“If anyone I work for wants to become an entrepreneur, my job is to make sure they acquire my skill set within two to three years of working for me. […] It’s my personal mission to empower the people within my organization to be able to go off and build their own thing if they want to. Because it’s how you solve problems in the world: you build companies around how to solve those problems.”

Michele Romanov, Co-founder of ClearBanc

Read the full article here.

“The way I inspire loyalty in my team is for them to see me more casually, to have lunch with members of my team, for them to see me with my family, my fiance, to see the real me.”

Jennifer Hyman, CEO and Co-founder of Rent The Runway

Read the full article here.

“My best advice is to be yourself! I think women leaders can be hesitant to be too expressive, talk about their personal lives, etc. If you are open and vulnerable with your team, they will be open and vulnerable with you. Creating an environment where people can be themselves and talk freely leads to better conversations and better work, and you need to lead by example.”

Rebecca Weizenecker, VP of Sales and Marketing at FundThrough

Read the full article here.

“I also say to my team: Do 10% of your job shittily. It’s okay to do something shittily. Perfectionism prevents us from taking double steps in our career. We think we have to be perfect, but we don’t.”

Reshma Saujani, Founder of Girls Who Code

Diversity

“Businesses perform better when you have diversity of view in your senior leadership positions. This is not just the right thing to do socially; it’s the right thing to do for your business.”

Reshma Saujani, CFO of Alphabet

“It is important to represent and be seen as an example of someone who doesn’t have the typical start-up background, but who is doing it. I think a lot of people would love a career as an entrepreneur or at a start-up, but never see anyone who looks like them doing it.”

Eva Wong, Co-founder of Borrowell

Read the full article here.

Risks and Failures

“The normal thing to do after your 100th ‘no’ would be to stop, but you just have to persevere. I’d continuously pour my energy into things that I could refine and fix, trying to find people who believed in my vision and would come along for the ride.”

Melanie Perkins, Co-founder and CEO of Canva

Read the full article here.

“When you actually find the investor that believes in you and believes in the way you look at the industry, it’s just going to feel like a discussion. Fundraising is really about finding the right person, it’s like dating actually. It will take longer than you think, it will be harder than you think but don’t get discouraged.”

Dawoon Kang, Co-founder of Coffee Meets Bagel

Read the full article here.

Every job I took, I was deeply uncomfortable in terms of feeling unqualified. Every step, every risk I took, built confidence.

Amy Hood, CFO Microsoft

Career Advice

“Though we do need more women to graduate with technical degrees, I always like to remind women that you don’t need to have science or technology degrees to build a career in tech.”

Susan Wojcicki, CEO of Youtube

“If you looked at my resume in the years leading up to Flickr, I worked in a dive shop in landlocked Arkansas; I was a starving artist. I just arrived at the thing I love to do accidentally.”

Catrina Fake, Co-founder of Flickr

“Love what you do and do what you love. Doing something new and different requires a level of drive and passion that is really hard to fake. When your heart is behind what you are doing, so much is possible.”

Susan Wojcicki, Co-Founder of Poshmark

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